A letter to my sister





A LETTER TO MY SISTER
 
Good Morning, my dearest sister.
I am reading your message and taking your thoughts into my mind. Understanding every word like they would be my own.
You and I We, are the most important persons on the world today.
I do really enjoy the life of my children’s and grandchildren´s, and the fantastic journey they will have in front of themselves.
Although it seems like we, you and I, don´t exist in their lives anymore.
Both, we are living in a grey zone, where we have to create the small dots of brightening stars to enlighten our daily lives.
 
My thoughts are going back to those days, especially in the darkness of November when we all were together around a big table. Family, sisters and brothers, children and grandchildren, for a dinner of the traditional goose dinner on Mårten´s eve. Sometimes only a duck or a turkey, depending on the fat dish, which wasn´t that easy for digestion.
On the dish also red cabbage prepared in sugar and vinegar, and fresh vegetables newly ripe for the autumn season. A tasty sauce from the broth of the birds. Feast with an apple cake and sauce vanilla for dessert.
Always homemade and so well cooked and tasty.
Of course, that was that time!
 
Today we are sitting here in our loneliness, in the prison, the quarantine, and silence that The Covid 19 created for us.
We are preparing  our small dishes, but chewing with absolutely no taste or smell.
The wine is sour, and the table is badly set for a proper meal.  The candles are blown out.
It’s a strange conversation with only our thoughts and memories.
 
Our eyes are crying with dry tears, and a small drop of anything couldn’t hold its softness or waking up our lives.
 
The nights are Nightmares and the darkness sending us figures of extreme nature, frightening, and not belonging to reality.
We are fighting every day, we are so full of life, so full of light from our inside, so much of power and strength, to make our days a goal, just for being and surviving.
Now we slowly wither like the falling leaves from the November air and the black and empty branches outside my window.
Sending you all my power and love, to also brightening up your day, and the darkness of November
.
.
 
14th of November.
Copyright k.c
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

LYRIC AND POETRY LESSON NO 8

We ended the latest lesson with the Elegy (The song of lamentation) and will now discuss some formal well known signs from the Hymn and the Ode. If we consider the Elegy as the dramatic actions and a story telling of the Epic elements, we will in the Hymn and Ode meet the pathos and outbursts of feelings for the Heroic poetry, often knitted to the Christian tradition. The Elegy is lamenting, the nostalgic looking back and discursive, while the Hymn is a song about the present time ( the moment) and the future. The stylistic signs are also much different. The Hymn does not have any needs for metrical forms, and no limits what so ever to find a place in any metrical foot, which of course opens up frames for the immeasurable we find in the style of Hymns. In the memory of genres in the world, the Hymn is just as old as the Elegy. A forerunner to the Hymn is already in the Sumerian and Egyptian poetry of culture and in the Old Testament Psalm poetry. Under the Greek antique time, the Hymn is reaching its literary highest point, and is to be found in a vast and different metrical forms and also in prose. Closer to our own time, the middle age Christian Hymn tradition, become very important, and still the Hymn is carrying this stamp of the liturgics and cult inheritance, from the great Choir lyrics in Greek antique time.

In our modern society it is not so common to separate a Hymn from the Ode. In English literature the Hymn has got a place, and is reserved for religious poetry, while the Ode is used rather wildly. The Ode was already in Greek tradition a close neighbour to the Hymn, but more precise in its form.

Example of the most common lyrical metres are Asklepiadeic stanza ( difficult to explain,but should be something like this: /Write now a stanza, brother Asklepios/.) and the Alcaic stanza often in four lines orderly together, the third line a bit slower in rhythm and a falling ending. The contents were less heroic and more sensitive, often like a ceremonial public poem for special occasions.

The Ode is counted as a secular form of the Hymn, which we can find in many poets use of the genre. Many examples of the Hymn carrying the Ode as a title but both are verses to praise someone or something. The capacity to describe closeness in the Hymn is mostly lying on the Apostrophe (the accentuation of a rhetoric figure) also very central in the Elegy. A great example of the apostrophe and the Hymn praising we can find in Percy Bysshe Shelley´ s

“Ode to the West Wind” (1819). ODE TO THE WEST WIND O WILD West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being– Thou from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing, Yellow, and black, and pale and hectic red, Pestilence-stricken multitudes!–O thou Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low, Each like a corpse within its grave, until Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow Her clarion o´er the dreaming earth, and fill (Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air) With living hues and odours plain and hill– Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere– Destroyer and Preserver– hear, O hear!

The poem consists of five parts like the first one hear above, and each on 14 stanzas and the verse meter is a combination of a sonnet in the length of verses and lines and a rhyme structure , of Terza rima. In England considered as the best example of the terse. The theme of the poem is clear and concrete. The Wild West wind, rolling over Italy in Autumn. The poem is also a speech to this phenomenon of Nature, which in this Hymn has got an almighty feature. Shelley is also given the wind a spiritual mind when he is talking about the “Wild Spirit” and the poem has also some more religious signs, not like a heroic psalm poem, cause in Shelley’s writing we got so much of romance and religious doubts. The Poem is a significant Hymn in its praising of the wind telling it to listen. ” Hear, O hear! There is also an ambivalent tone in Shelley’s Ode. the Wind is blowing out the organic life and sending it to the grave. “like a corpse within its grave”, but even though the wind is violent and death bringing, it has also a function of giving life and renewal of Nature. This can, at least in my poetic mind, transmit the meaning to a human being and to our capacity and optimistic creating after Autumn’s pessimistic, dead of growing. Of Shelley’s Hymn and the form of an Epigram, we can see that the Hymn is a great contrast to the Elegy and is functioning as, not for something we have lost, but as an affirmative answer to Reality. Let us here finish the lesson, with the fact that the Apostrophe is the most obvious form of addressing, which shows the speciality of the poetic speech. ©kerstin centervall ·          

Lyric and Poetry Lesson no 8

We ended the latest lesson with the Elegy (The song of lamentation)
and will now discuss some formal well known signs from the Hymn and
the Ode.
If we consider the Elegy as the dramatic actions and a story telling of the Epic elements, we will in the Hymn and Ode meet the pathos and
outbursts of feelings for the Heroic poetry, often knitted to the Christian tradition. The Elegy is lamenting, the nostalgic looking back and discursive,
while the Hymn is a song about the present time ( the moment) and the future.
The stylistic signs are also much different. The Hymn does not have any needs for metrical forms, and no limits what so ever to find a place in any metrical foot, which of course opens up frames for the immeasurable we find in the style of Hymns.
In the memory of genres in the world, the Hymn is just as old as the Elegy.
A forerunner to the Hymn is already in the Sumerian and Egyptian poetry of culture and in the Old Testament Psalm poetry.
Under the Greek antique time, the Hymn is reaching its literary highest point, and is to be found in a vast and different metrical forms and also in prose.
Closer to our own time, the middle age Christian Hymn tradition, become very important, and still the Hymn is carrying this stamp of the liturgies and cult inheritance, from the great Choir lyrics in Greek antique time.
In our modern society it is not so common to separate a Hymn from the Ode.
In English literature the Hymn has got a place, and is reserved for religious poetry, while the Ode is used rather wildly.
The Ode was already in Greek tradition a close neighbour to the Hymn, but more precise in its form. Example of the most common lyrical metres are
Asklepiadeic stanza ( difficult to explain,but should be something like this: /Write now a stanza, brother Asklepios/.) and the Alcaic stanza often in four
lines orderly together, the third line a bit slower in rhythm and a falling ending.
The contents were less heroic and more sensitive, often like a ceremonial public poem for special occasions.
The Ode is counted as a secular form of the Hymn, which we can find in many
poets use of the genre. Many examples of the Hymn carrying the Ode as
a title but both are verses to praise someone or something.
The capacity to describe closeness in the Hymn is mostly lying on the Apostrophe (the accentuation of a rhetoric figure) also very central in the Elegy

A great example of the apostrophe and the Hymn praising we can find in
Percy Bysshe Shelley´ s “Ode to the West Wind” (1819).
ODE TO THE WEST WIND

O WILD West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being–
Thou from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,
Yellow, and black, and pale and hectic red,
Pestilence-stricken multitudes!–O thou
Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed
The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low,
Each like a corpse within its grave, until
Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow
Her clarion o´er the dreaming earth, and fill
(Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air)
With living hues and odours plain and hill–
Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere–
Destroyer and Preserver– hear, O hear!

The poem consists of five parts like the first one hear above,
and each on 14 stanzas and the verse meter is a combination of
a sonnet in the length of verses and lines and a rhyme structure ,
of Terza rima. In England considered as the best example of the terse.
The theme of the poem is clear and concrete. The Wild West wind,
rolling over Italy in Autumn. The poem is also a speech to this
phenomenon of Nature, which in this Hymn has got an almighty
feature. Shelley is also given the wind a spiritual mind when he is talking about
the “Wild Spirit” and the poem has also some more religious signs, not like a
heroic psalm poem, cause in Shelley’s writing we got so much of romance and
religious doubts. The Poem is a significant Hymn in its praising of the wind telling it to listen. ” Hear, O hear!
There is also an ambivalent tone in Shelley’s Ode. the Wind is blowing out the
organic life and sending it to the grave. “like a corpse within its grave”, but even though the wind is violent and death bringing, it has also a function of giving life and renewal of Nature. This can, at least in my poetic mind, transmit the meaning to a human being and to our capacity and optimistic creating after Autumn’s pessimistic, dead of growing.

Of Shelley’s Hymn and the form of an Epigram, we can see that the Hymn is a great contrast to the Elegy and is functioning as, not for something we have lost, but as an affirmative answer to Reality.

Let us here finish the lesson, with the fact that the Apostrophe is the most obvious form of addressing, which shows the speciality of the poetic speech.

©kerstin centervall

Lyric and Poetry

LYRIC AND POETRY
Lesson no 7.

Starting my lesson with genre as an “invitation to form”
When analyzing, we have always put up questions about belonging to
a genre.
I am here only referring to the Spanish specialist in research of literature,
Claudio Guillén who is pointing out a matter, about our questioning of genres.
Do they have any interest on our studies, as they change in both form and context many times?.
Big systems of classification as found with Käte Hamburger ( 1957) and
Northrop Fry (1957) are not easy to adapt.
We follow therefore the thoughts of Claudio Guillén that genres and lower genres not any longer are a must, but a great folder of possibilities.
He says: “All previous forms, that is, become a matter in the hands of the artists work.” The form will be an invitation and an urge to the text which is to be written. It is to be added that the form you will decide to, as a lower genre,
very often belong to a convention of context that means, that the invitation will also refer to themes used in the history of genres.
This can give us not only history to a special genre but also future possibilities.

The Elegy.
The greek word “elegeia” which comes from “elegos” a song of lamentation.
This form will be found long back in our civilisation . The classic Greek elegy
is in form very distinct through its metric structure, but it is filled by a free amount of elegiac distica (sing. distikon) a verse which is build on two lines . At first one hexameter ( sex dactyls ) and then a following pentameter ( five dactyls)

A dactyl (Greek: δάκτυλος, dáktylos, “finger”) is a foot in poetic meter. In quantitative verse, often used in Greek or Latin, a dactyl is a long syllable followed by two short syllables, as determined by syllable weight. In accentual verse, often used in English, it is a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables—the opposite is the anapaest (two unstressed followed by a stressed syllable).
Both the hexameter and the pentameter have great possibilities of variations.
If the elegy, already since classical time, was rarely hard defined in form, it was very free in consideration of context and subjects. It was used in many different themes, also far from a song of lamentation. The elegy was probably close to the epos. Both written in the verse of hexameter, and both have as an important
part subjects of mysticism. The people making research mean that from the beginning the elegy theme was lamentation, before the sixth century B.C. when it started to be not so proper and the form gave opportunities for other themes as political. The leading man of law, Solon for example, wrote some elegies around
600 B.C. about happiness and justice. Many elegies were written to be used
on special festivities as drinking songs accompanied by flute players.

If the poem consist of only one elegy distikon, ( only two lines)it is often
an epigram we are talking about.
The epigram is one of the first distinguished lower genre which not was meant to be recited or to be sung. Often a script on a tombstone.

The elegy, is what is meant as a way of looking back to the essence of the referring meanings of the language.
The “invitation” is the distinction from the Elegy and the German poet
Friedrich Hölderlin wrote in his Epigram “Sophocles 1799”

Viele versuchen umsonst das Freudigste freudig zu sagen
Hier spricht endlich es mir, Hier in der Trauer sich aus./Hölderin/

Many tried however in vain, to in joy tell,the biggest happiness/
Here it will by itself speak to me, Here in the sorrow. /Hölderlin /

The Epigram has a surprising point of view and Hölderlins many years of
work with the tragedies of Sophocles, lead us to a dramatising of the Ego and to find the right expression for happiness which not is possible only in joy, but how the joy is speaking to him through the sorrows.

About Sophocles who lived /ca 497 B.C. – 406 B.C. We must mention his great importance in early Drama. The most famous tragedies are the Theban plays consisting of three plays : Oedipus the King ( also called Oedipus Tyrannus or by its Latin title Oedipus Rex), Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone. All three plays concerning the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus,
but not made as a trilogy. The plays written for festival competitions and with many years in between.
His Antigone,the Women in Trachis and Eelctra all known over the whole world.
Sophocles dramas were written later than for example Aischylos(also belonging to the great Greek drama authors living between 525 B.C. – 456 B.C. ) Sophocles wrote about 120 dramatic plays but only seven of them have been saved as complete works. Sophocles also gave new and important impulses to the drama where he added a third actor and increased the choir members from 12 into 15.
Sophocles was engaged in high political duties in Athen and became after his dead a subject for a so called Heroic cult. Both (Iophon one of his sons and a grandchild) became also authors of tragedies.

Here I must end my writings for today and will on next occasion write about
the Hymn.

©kerstin centervall

Lyric and Poetry

LYRIC AND POETRY
Lesson no 6

Shortly I will take up  the relation between lyric and history. the reality and
the society .
There are lots of examples of lyric poetry running from a wish to tell us about
the society and its existence, in the meaning of having a social function and also
being a political power. We can also be sure of the fact that the lyric can succeed
very well in such projects.
By reading Pindaros ( born 522 or 518 B.C. and dead 446 or 438 B.C. ) considered as the greatest poets during Antique time and much admired by the Roman poets where he in his odes are writing about the Olympic Athletes, and also showed us about their Aristocratic nobleness. Here, we also learn something about the Greek society and understand that his work was ordered with a clear social-political meaning and to honour the heroes of the Aristocrats. The mystique and the poetic quality in those poems make them not as truly poems for ordinary use but we can’t forget that his meaning was obvious to describe the Aristocratic
rules and historical reality.
In the Middle Age time, we also find poetry in close relation to the Courts, describing, criticizing and confirming the steady society. A good example is Walter von der Vogelweide(1170-1230) and his (Minnerlieder) in where he gives us notes about the Kingdom and its fight towards the Power of Popes.
A later form of social engaged lyric is the Working songs as connection for the strength and arguments to find better conditions in the hard working class. Example the “International”, written in 1871 by the French and revolutionary ballad poet.EugènePottier

ELEGY AND HYMN
Through different times has also genre of new and (lower classes of genres) taken form.We have Elegy, Ode, Epigram, Dràpa, Ballads and Rondeau ,that is different in form and context. The differences and to maintain the form of those have a central factor in its writing and publishing- and of course in reading of lyrics.
Every genre has a recognisable structure as all text must have a motive and a theme to be understandable.
The word “genre” is related to generation and to birth and is obvious in every text.
To work with a poem, we can search for structure and the bounded form and it is so obvious that those rules are connected to the genre.
Today we stand in front of the fact that we are no longer capable of recognizing the old genres and the genres below.

In a iambic poem it could rhyme after the scheme, aba bcb cdc and so on in a chain rhyme,but it is not many people who can see that this line form is Dantes terzin (terza rima) and the form of Divina Commedia, where a sole verse is written in eleven syllables (endecasillabo). It is clear that this old scheme can pop up in new and modern poetry but never being recognized.
Dante found this rhyming scheme very useful in his work as the verses goes into each other and force the verses forward. The group of three and three is also connected to the Christian symbolic of speech.(The Trinity).

The genres are very close to the poets and the readers knowledge.
Today in modern society many more people are reading compared to the Middle Age, and literature has got a more great sphere. But also among educated people it is not many completely intimate with the form of (Terza rima). We hope that this will change and I am sure it will, cause still we are having education and courses about (prosody) metrical stanza and poetic forms ,which will keep the lyric poetry living.
Although the generations have lost the hard grip and severe regulative method, and the expectations are much less about prosody than only 100 years ago.

In next lesson I will go on with the Elegy ( Song of lamentation ), the Hymn (Song of praise) and the Ode. which have a great historical interest.

©kerstin centervall

Who am I(HSP)

Who I am

Highly Sensitive People have a great capacity for empathy and easily perceive the feelings of others, are attentive to non-verbal communication and are deeply influenced by the emotional climate of the environment in which they find themselves.

Features

Since childhood , the Highly Sensitive are very intuitive, generous and show a tendency to perfectionism present even in adulthood, for this reason they often have high expectations of what they do.

The instinct for protection for the weakest, the anger towards injustice together with the deep connection with emotions, both one’s own and others’, make the Highly Sensitive a fine observer of the world, able to immediately perceive uncomfortable situations and give other what he needs.

“Highly Sensitive People generally live life so differently than most of the people around them that they often carry a sense of diversity, strangeness and misunderstanding that can cause a lot of suffering and a sense of marginalization” explains Dr. Elena Lupo, Biosystemic Psychologist and Psychotherapist with clinical activity in Bologna.

The great sensitivity in many cases is also … leather! Through psychosomatic illnesses , the epidermis, which distinguishes the subtle border between us and others, becomes the channel in which stress, sense of danger and anxiety occur.

Typical traits of highly sensitive people:

1) They pay attention to details and process information more deeply. These are solitary thinkers led to critical reflection

2) More easily subject to overstimulation and overload, they struggle to manage conflicts

3) They show an immediate empathic connection with close people, the animal world and nature

4) They are immediately affected by the emotional environment, perceiving unresolved tensions and hidden conflicts

5) They are often perfectionists and have high expectations, which is why they can easily appear intolerant, restless, unsatisfied

6) Like fish that live in too acidic a pH, Highly Sensitive People flee from too much noise to find peace in nature and frequently show great pleasure in being in or near the water

7) Changes are often a source of stress: in cases like these there is a strong need for moments to devote to observation and reflection

8) They are interested in the less material and therefore more profound and spiritual aspects of existence. Tendency towards introspection and reflection.

9) They have a great emotional reactivity to events, and also on a physical level they show more intense reactions than the average

What is hypersensitivity?

Studied by Dr. Elaine Aron’s group in California since the 1980s , hypersensitivity is defined as a genetic and hereditary trait, characteristic and unchangeable which has been found in 20% of the population (also in many other animal species) and which, intersecting with the rest of the individual character, with personal history and the cultural environment, contributes to influencing the experience of the world and social relations. The greater depth of processing stimuli, especially of a social nature, makes highly sensitive people particularly permeable in an emotional sense with respect to the situations that surround them.

Living as Highly Sensitive People

«Living as a highly sensitive person means picking 1000 shades in every detail; it means feeling submerged by the stimulation of the external world but also by the internal one, having to learn to manage the overload. It means having a particular propensity for deep observation; it means to be easily moved or to feel easily tired and irritable when you are overloaded; it means feeling everything and more intensely, both positive and negative things, and at the same time making an incredible effort to make it understood by others who do not have this characteristic.

It also means automatically tending to anticipate the needs of those around us and taking care of people and situations up to making it very difficult to stay centered on your needs. Generally it also means feeling different, often out of place, being often told that you are “too much”: too sensitive, too sensitive, too deep, too reflective, too tired, too slow or too fast, too emotional.

Fortunately, sometimes it also means being told that we are excellent confidants, that people feel free to talk about themselves, that we naturally tend to want to live in harmony and be attentive to others, that we are particularly conscientious and attentive, that we bring out the best in deep situations, that we have artistic talents and great creativity “. Explains Dr. Lupo.

How to handle the conflict

«A frequent theme is the difficulty in managing the conflict» continues the expert «We have a great difficulty in saying no . We are little in touch with our needs and much more projected on the needs of others. Conflict means wanting different things, here’s the difficulty: how can I express a different opinion by recognizing my needs without trampling on the needs of others? This is particularly complicated, because the Highly Sensitive Person finds it difficult to distinguish his own needs from those of others and remain serenely focused on his own ».

What happens is that we generally accumulate stress until we reach a definitive breaking point, however the challenge is to learn to manage divergences through a conscious look and start to express our truths, making others understand clearly what is important for us.

Lyric and Poetry Lesson no 5

LYRIC AND POETRY¨
Lesson no 5

From Mental pictures and visualisation to partly embody our language and
words with metamorphosis, I will now step forward to another kind of poetic
language.
Words like “you” and “I” are real pictures of a body, a person, but also
fragments of , “hands, skin, eyes and warmth” all those mental pictures we
use as our thoughts to create a photographic experience.

Pictures in a language can also be an attempt to create a reality which is easy
to recognize, which of course is something else than the poetical transforming
of senses and its presence.

We need here a dress for the language with a good shape .
We need a strong base for reality.
And this is called a “Realistic” picture, cause there is a close relation between
the outer reality and the pictures of the verbal expression.

However it is clear that we stand in front of a poetic text.
The daily language gives a rejected place, not making it fitting into that
good shape or dress to be strong enough to survive.
And the place of “I” or “you” is not describing a reality but is mentioning a reality, which must be seen upon as lyrical.
The possibility to, in the language imitate or visualize, is much discussed.
The word “Picture” is in itself representing, the fact of a picture(mirror) of something else.
This is leading us to the famous and misunderstood expression of Horace
“ut pictura ut poesis” “Like the picture so also the poem.” In reality the place
of Ars Poetica referring to the fact that some pictures also paintings get a better
perspective to be seen at a distance. The format , distance and perspective must
have a chance to be allowed of some faults and inaccuracy .

This takes us to another fundamental difference between pictures and lyrics.
The art of painting and pictures are seen upon as (Spatial) a perception of space,
as the important dimension ,while poetry or lyrics are ( Temporal) and where the discursive knowledge, (discursive, from the Latin word discurrere/ running forth and back) form the thinking and the resulting dimension.
So description of pictures in poetry is not an attempt to reach the reality like in photography or paintings but to give a sensation, a recognition of feelings
and with the photographic focus, analyze the intention of the poem.

So much more is to be discussed in Lyrics and Poetry … Heavy studies
is needed, to reach the Imagist tradition of Ezra Pound in the poem “In a station of the Metro” (1913)
The poem is Pound’s, written equivalent for the moment of revelation and intense emotion he felt at the Metro at La Concorde, Paris.
“The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
petals on a wet, black bough.”(E.P.)

Or in the lovely and lyrical language as below :

“When the mind swings by a grass-blade
An ant’s forefoot shall save you
The clover leaf smells and tastes as its flower.” (E.P.)
“A Girl”.
The tree has entered my hands,
The sap has ascended my arms,
The tree has grown in my breast –
Downward,
The branches grow out of me, like arms.

Tree you are,
Moss you are,
You are violets with wind above them.
A child – so high – you are,
And all this is folly to the world.(E.P.)

©kerstin centervall

LYRIC AN POETRY

LYRIC AND POETRY
Lesson no 4

In lesson 3 we started to talk about metamorphoses, and the importance
of visualisation. The pictures used in the poem have often a direct understanding
of the pictures created in the mind of the reader.

More of visualisation is connected to our senses. We call them for
Mental pictures. It is normal to separate those categories into 7 .
The first one is Auditive pictures (belonging to our hearing). The second and third one Olfactory pictures( belonging to smelling, and odour). Tactile pictures(belonging to touching and feeling of for example temperatures /heat, coldness/) and Organic pictures belonging to the living part of life. Finally the Kinetic pictures dealing with our body language (movements)

Those categories are partly hiding the fact that the language of pictures is an
intervention of the speaking language and cannot always been visualised as
anticipated pictures.
“This new creation” shows an imaginable universe. An immense combination
of the senses to create a world of pictures can be used.
Example: A peach-dress give us both colour, taste, smell, and perhaps also a tactile experience.
“The hot benches of the eyes” distort a visualised expression into a mental picture and ask the reader to think of ( sitting down on a warm bench)–
and at the same time it is an eye. On this bench “I am in the back of the sun”
and again, an association to warmth in combination with hand , skin, palm and back.

All those metamorphosis are closer to another technique in combining
unexpected experiences of the senses, called Synaesthesia or an analogy of
the senses.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) died only 46 years old, wrote a very famous programme for this in the sonnet “Correspondences” (1857) which often is used in modernistic poetry.
Here follows his poem from the Poetry collection Fleurs du Mal .
(Flowers of Evil.)

Correspondances
La Nature est un temple où de vivants piliers
Laissent parfois sortir de confuses paroles;
L’homme y passe à travers des forêts de symboles
Qui l’observent avec des regards familiers.
Comme de longs échos qui de loin se confondent
Dans une ténébreuse et profonde unité,
Vaste comme la nuit et comme la clarté,
Les parfums, les couleurs et les sons se répondent.
II est des parfums frais comme des chairs d’enfants,
Doux comme les hautbois, verts comme les prairies,
— Et d’autres, corrompus, riches et triomphants,
Ayant l’expansion des choses infinies,
Comme l’ambre, le musc, le benjoin et l’encens,
Qui chantent les transports de l’esprit et des sens.
— Charles Baudelaire
Correspondences
Nature is a temple in which living pillars
Sometimes give voice to confused words;
Man passes there through forests of symbols
Which look at him with understanding eyes.
Like prolonged echoes mingling in the distance
In a deep and tenebrous unity,
Vast as the dark of night and as the light of day,
Perfumes, sounds, and colours correspond.
There are perfumes as cool as the flesh of children,
Sweet as oboes, green as meadows
— And others are corrupt, and rich, triumphant,
With power to expand into infinity,
Like amber and incense, musk, benzoin,
That sing the ecstasy of the soul and senses.
— William Aggeler, The Flowers of Evil (Fresno, CA: Academy Library Guild, 1954)With
With this poem and much to learn I suggest that we finish this lesson , although
difficult enough to take into our minds and to our perception.
©kerstin centervall

Lyric and Poetry

LYRIC AND POETRY (lesson 3)

LYRIC AND POETRY
Lesson 3

Today I will take up the subject about visualizing and closeness.
The poetic or lyric languish has a variety of giving us pictures.
In some ways we can use the words direct from our nature, like stars
trees, sky , and sea, and we can also colour those words ,using their real
colour but also make them different to reality.
As a poet we have also the freedom to see something else in the nature
to use our imagination, to form and create another picture to the reader.
An example:
I, a wanderer meeting here the old oak
like a stoned moose with a miles wide crown
before the September Sea
and its black green fortress.

Northern Storm. It’s the time when roan berries
in bunches are growing ripe
Awake in the darkness you hear
the stars stamping in their nests
high over the tree. ( a free translation of a poem by Transtömer)

In Prose: A wanderer finding an old oak and suddenly the oak
starts to look like a moose with its crown.
The wanderer is at the Sea, it is September and a Northern storm.
He has seen the roan berries being red and will admit that the winter
is close( the roan berries time for being ripe) and in his nightly imagination he can see the stars high over the tree.

This is an example of how the poet can see something which is an earthly mystery and an universal dimension not real.  The verse is close to a Greek verse
scheme almost like a Sapphic strophe.

The term “picture” is not precise but is so obvious to the poetic imaginational world that we can’t avoid it.
We can also use a metaphorical language to make our pictures.
A form which can be both living and dead metaphors.
The best example I can give is the word leg of the Stool… as a dead metaphor, which we not see as a poetic word but here connected to the body as creating a picture from only words.
When the leg of the Stool is connected to the sit place it will further more get
a back and it is not possible to describe this phenomenon in an alternative way.
This is called catachresis, from the Greek word, meaning misuse and in a bigger meaning that we press the meaning of the word.
The Word catachresis is often considered as non rhetoric because there are
always some mistakes.
Another example of a dead metaphor but NOT catachresis is “The foot of the Mountain”, which is heavy but fully possible to use but also to exchange to some other words . “The ground, the base, of the Mountain”

We know that a Metaphor is a figure of speech ,strongly implying similarities
of two items directly compared as equal and does not apply any words like
“such as” “like” or “as”.
The metaphor is very close to the Allegoric figure, where a symbolic thing will be embodied and must be interpreted by the reader to be understandable, often used in fables, fairy stories and also in the bible.
A good example is the story “Roman of the Rose”, by Guillaume de Lorris probably started on the verses already in 1240 and translated by Geoffrey Chaucer (born 1343 and dead around 1400) where the rose gets the body of a woman, and in the fables or fairy stories of Perrault’s “Tales of Mother Goose.” A collection of fairy tales and nursery rhymes.
The goose itself, the name of an archetypal country woman. The English readers were already familiar to “Mother Hubbard” a stock of figures, when Edmund Spencer published his satire “Mother Hubbard’s Tale in 1590.

The science can confirm, that the philosophical use of the language and in our thinking take a form of pictures in our minds. To understand the mental pictures of the poetic language or the poem created of the writer and to bee seen by the reader is important for understanding.

The next part of my articles will take up other mental pictures, so here I stop for today.
Take care.

Lyric and Poetry

LYRIC AND POETRY
Lesson no 2.

Lyric poetry has often been mentioned as short texts, but to this we have some
very good example in the most famous of the English speaking language of
John Milton´s “Paradise Lost” reaching over many hundreds of pages.
It is therefore important to underline that Lyric, not always is to be considered
as poetry… No one can deny that Paradise Lost has much of a lyric form, but
the most significant sign is the Epic form and story telling poem.
The second is that the poem has not that closeness from the writer to the
receiver as we connect with Lyric Poetry. The third argument about Paradise Lost is that it can’t be considered as Lyric Poem with that length.

Edgar Allen Poe was the poet and author who claimed that lyric poetry should be short, and this is a relatively new view of lyric poetry.
The convention telling that the lyric poem should be short is very problematic in
many fundamental ways.
We are in the romantic genre of poetry using many long stories as in Esias Tegner´s (The tale of Fritiof) and still it is the musicality and the visibility and the lyrical closeness between the writer and what is written which have the most important aspects.

Novalis (pseudonym for Georg Philipp Friedrich Leopold von Hardenberg)
A German writer and Poet often called (the Prophet of Romanticism) have given us an idea of the fact that a poet is obsessed by the language and Novalis theory about the language, which according to him should have a life of its own. He thought that a writer is neglecting his own power of the words and letting himself
be led of the language and also the French poet Stephane Mallarme underlined in his Essay “Crise de Verse” that writing is mostly a work with words.

And here I must stop for today.. NOT agreeing with either Novalis or Mallarme and NOT denying either.. The words are fascinating and taking also me into some sort of possession.

©kerstin centervall

FROM THE RAVEN AND OTHER POEMS
Edgar Allan Poe

To F———-

Beloved! amid the earnest woes
That crowd around my earthly path—
(Dear path, alas! where grows
Not even one lonely rose)—
My soul at least a solace hath
In dreams of thee, and therein knows
An Eden of bland repose.

And thus thy memory is to me
Like some enchanted far-off isle
In some tumultuous sea—
Some ocean throbbing far and free
With storms—but where meanwhile
Serenest skies continually
just o´er that one bright island smile.

(And certainly this poem is lyric with both musicality, visuality and closeness)

©kerstin centervall)